Spathiphyllum

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Catalina

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp.

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.

Domino Variegata

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp.

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.

Emerald

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp.

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.

Silver

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp.

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.

Sensation

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp.

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.

Sensation Variegata

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp.

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.

Viviana

The Peace lily, Spathiphyllum viviana, is a popular, low maintenance house plant with glossy green leaves and white flowers, called spathes. Native to central America, it's used to a warm, humid environment and can be perfect for growing in a bright bathroom. Peace lilies are easy to grow and relatively trouble-free. Keep your living space looking fresh and vibrant with this cheerful companion--no green thumb required! Plus, it's said to purify the air of toxins, making it the perfect addition to any indoor oasis.

The Peace lily name comes from it's beautiful flowers, thought to resemble white flags, they are symbolic of peace. The Viviana variety has a stunning dark green leaf that is slightly broader than other varieties. The dark green leaf has pointed tips and has deep ridges in the foliage, giving this beautiful plant great texture to enjoy. This elegant variety also grows many leaves close together creating a big lush plant and with its hearty, full-blooming properties you’ll find this variety will flower often with several flowers at a time. These plants are particularly hardy and can tolerant neglect like champs so they make a great beginner plant, and also make amazing gifts for new plant people.

Botanical Name: Spathiphyllum spp. viviana

Water: Spathiphyllum’s tend to drink a lot of water so you may find you are watering this plant more than others in your home. In general, water when the top inch of soil has dried out. In winter, reduce watering but never allow the soil to dry out completely. This can stress out the plant and you may find you can loose a leaf or two, however as mentioned earlier these plants are pretty tolerant so missing a water once in a white isn’t going to kill the plant.

Light: Peace lilies indoors need some light lovin', not direct sun, but bright, filtered light to look their best. This variety can tolerate some slightly more mid to low light spots in your home, however, she is also a big bloomer and with a little extra filtered light, this plant will flower often and plenty! So if flowers are your jam, definitely have this plant in bright light.

Potting Media: Peace lilies desire a luxe, light potting mix rich in organic matter. Just keep an eye on the dampness - these plants don't like soggy, wet soil, so opt for a well-draining blend.

Humidity: Spathiphyllum can tolerate average humidity and are usually fine in most homes in New Zealand’s climate. They aren’t a big fan of cold droughts or continuous cold spaces, so keep them clear of an open window over night in winter and keep them inside. 

Temperature:  Further more from above, Spathiphyllum love a warm humid spot and can tolerate slightly cooler spaces during New Zealand winters. Keep in mind, if your plant is exposed to prolonged cold temperatures it may brown the leaves and eventually die.

Fertiliser: Spathiphyllum appreciate frequent feedings, which can result in a strong plant and seasonal blooming. Depending on your choose of fertiliser you can fertilise your plant year round, and diluting your fertiliser by half the recommended dose during the winter months

Toxicity: Unfortunately Spathiphyllum’s are toxic to pets and people when ingested.

Origin: Central America, Asia

Extra Care + Tips: Under the perfect conditions, peace lilies grow with ease. But if not, hiccups may occur. Curled and pale leaves may indicate that the plant is receiving too much direct sunlight. Curled foliage and not colour changes may be caused by lack of water. Browning on your peace lily's leaf tips can be due to too much or too little water, as well as poor soil drainage. It also can be due to extreme low temperatures and humidity. Plus, the buildup of salts in the soil may be a culprit. 

Fun fact: Like many flora, peace lilies hold symbolism. The peace lily signifies sympathy, hope, healing and—of course—peace. It's often bestowed as a gift to those grieving the loss of a loved one.